PBMC from 6 HLA-A2+ individuals were stained with tetramers specific for two HLA-A2-restricted PAP epitopes, p112-120 and p299-307,34 and manifestation of PD-1, BTLA, TIM-3, LAG-3, and CD160 was then assessed on these PAP-specific CD8+ T cells via circulation cytometry

PBMC from 6 HLA-A2+ individuals were stained with tetramers specific for two HLA-A2-restricted PAP epitopes, p112-120 and p299-307,34 and manifestation of PD-1, BTLA, TIM-3, LAG-3, and CD160 was then assessed on these PAP-specific CD8+ T cells via circulation cytometry. individuals’ circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We observed no significant changes in T-cell manifestation of PD-1 or additional checkpoint receptors, but antigen-specific immune responses were recognized and/or augmented with PD-1 blockade as recognized by IFN and granzyme B secretion or DTH screening. Moreover, PD-L1 manifestation was improved on CTCs following vaccination, and this PD-L1 upregulation was associated with the development of sustained T-cell Methyllycaconitine citrate immunity and longer progression-free survival. Finally, similar results were observed with individuals treated with sipuleucel-T, another vaccine focusing on the same prostate antigen. These Methyllycaconitine citrate findings provide in-human rationale for combining anticancer vaccines with PD-1 obstructing antibodies, particularly for the treatment of prostate malignancy, a disease for which vaccines have shown benefit and yet PD-1 inhibitors have shown little medical benefit to day as monotherapies. and methods, we found that immune reactions to PAP were recognized and/or augmented when combined with PD-1 blockade. Moreover, we detected improved manifestation of PD-L1 on CTCs following vaccination, and we found that higher manifestation correlated with the development of antigen-specific IFN-secreting immune responses. Related findings were also observed in individuals treated with sipuleucel-T, an FDA-approved immunotherapy for prostate malignancy which focuses on the same PAP RXRG antigen. Collectively, these data provide substantial evidence to support combining antitumor vaccines having a PD-1 pathway inhibitor in medical trials, an approach we are currently pursuing by using this DNA vaccine (“type”:”clinical-trial”,”attrs”:”text”:”NCT02499835″,”term_id”:”NCT02499835″NCT02499835). In addition, our findings suggest that dynamic monitoring of PD-L1 manifestation on CTCs could be a simple means to assess antitumor immunity induced by different treatments. Results PD-1-controlled PAP-specific T cells are elicited in individuals following DNA vaccination Methyllycaconitine citrate We have previously carried out a Phase I medical trial in which individuals with castrate-resistant, non-metastatic prostate malignancy were treated at least 6?instances biweekly having a DNA vaccine encoding PAP.30 Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples from these patients were used to assess for changes in T-cell checkpoints and ligands associated with the development of antigen-specific immunity. We 1st analyzed the manifestation of various immune checkpoint receptors on antigen-specific T cells elicited via vaccination. PBMC from 6 HLA-A2+ individuals were stained with tetramers specific for two HLA-A2-restricted PAP epitopes, p112-120 and p299-307,34 and manifestation of PD-1, BTLA, TIM-3, LAG-3, and CD160 was then assessed on these PAP-specific CD8+ T cells via circulation cytometry. As demonstrated in Fig.?1A, we observed no significant changes in the manifestation of any of these checkpoint receptors over the course of vaccination. However, given that this approach was limited to HLA-A2 restricted PAP-specific T cells in a small number of individuals, we next utilized functional assays to analyze the effect of checkpoint rules on antigen-specific immune responses following vaccination in all individuals. PBMC collected 1?y post-treatment were cultured with recombinant PAP protein (or ovalbumin as a negative control, Fig.?S1) in combination with antibodies blocking PD-1 or TIM-3; ELISA was used to quantify cytokines secreted. Fig.?1B demonstrates that antigen-specific secretion of both IFN and granzyme B was increased when PD-1 was blocked. This was determined to be due to CD8+ T cells, as IFN and granzyme B secretion improved following PD-1 blockade using isolated CD8+ T cells with purified autologous dendritic cells (Fig.?S2). Interestingly, however, we saw a slight decrease in PAP-specific TNF secretion when combined with PD-1 blockade. We also observed that TIM-3 blockade, although having no effect on antigen-specific Th1 cytokine production, significantly reduced the PAP-specific secretion of IL-10, a classically-inhibitory Th2 cytokine. No changes in additional cytokine levels (IL-2, IL-6, MCP-1, GRO, Methyllycaconitine citrate or soluble Fas) were observed after tradition in the presence of PD-1 or TIM-3 blockade (data not shown). Open in a separate window Number 1. PAP-specific immune responses elicited following DNA vaccination are controlled by PD-1. (A) PBMC from HLA-A2+ individuals (n = 6) were stained with tetramers for both p112-120 and p299-307, two HLA-A2-restricted PAP epitopes, and analyzed for their manifestation of various checkpoint molecules. Graphs display the rate of recurrence of PAP-specific CD8+ T cells (% of total CD8+) or the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of PD-1, TIM-3, LAG-3, BTLA, or CD160 on the surface of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells from pre-treatment, and 3?mo and 1?y post-treatment, samples. (B) 1?y post-treatment PBMC were stimulated with recombinant PAP protein in the presence of PD-1 or TIM-3 blocking antibodies (or IgG control), and cytokine secretion after 72?h (36?h for TNF) was assessed by ELISA. Graphs display.